ADDITIONAL EXERCISES

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CHAPTER 7

Chapter 7 defines and discusses memory skills, provides tips and tricks for storing information and building knowledge, and explores the (mostly) downside of multitasking.

Exercises

  1. Describe a test you’ve taken recently that tested your ability to recognize information. How did you study for it? How did you do on it? What are the benefits and drawbacks of these kinds of tests?
  2. Now describe a test you’ve taken recently that tested your ability to recall information. How did you study for it? How did you do on it? What are the benefits and drawbacks of these kinds of tests?
  3. With a partner, create an exam for this chapter (or another chapter in this book) that tests students’ abilities to recognize or recall information. Switch exams with another pair of students. After all parties have taken an exam and graded it, discuss the process: To what extent did preparing a test help you remember the material? What were the best questions and prompts? Why?
  4. Multitasking Log. Challenge yourself: What’s the longest you can focus on a single school-related task, such as reading, studying, writing, researching, or working in the lab? The next time you’re working on a school-related task, keep track of the number of minutes you spend on task versus the number of minutes you spend off task (checking email, getting a snack, picking out the perfect music to accompany your work, etc.). Write 1 – 2 paragraphs that reflect on what you learned about your own multitasking and/or the interruptions you encounter.

Exercises (LDC Website only)

  1. Test your focus and ability to juggle tasks with these interactive features from The New York Times:www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/06/07/technology/20100607-distraction-filtering-demo.html?ref=technology
    www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/06/07/technology/20100607-task-switching-demo.html
  1. Read Science Daily’s “Multi-Tasking Adversely Affects Brain’s Learning, UCLA Psychologists Report” (www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/07/060726083302.htm) and Wired.com’s “Multitasking Muddles Brains, Even When the Computer is Off” (www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/08/multitasking/) . What are three key points of each article? Write 2 – 3 questions related to these articles that you’d like to discuss in class.
  2. What are some of the benefits of multitasking? On your own or with a partner, find credible articles and reports that suggest that there is a neutral to positive effect of multitasking.
  3. Read Time Magazine’s article “Gen M: The Multitasking Generation”www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1174696,00.html. What assumptions does the author make? What evidence is there to support the author’s assertions? What questions does the article raise?
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